Blog Archives

First T Shirt Quilt

FirstShirtQuilt

I have finally finished my first t-shirt quilt! It was, in all honesty, a fairly easy project. The hardest part is the cutting, it’s so time consuming. If I really cared about the end size of my quilt, I’d think another hard part would be figuring out how big you need to cut the shirts to make the size of quilt you wanted. I knew I didn’t want a baby/lap quilt or a king size, so I was happy with anywhere in the middle. This is going to be a quick “how to” because there are so many ways to quilt and so many blogs that do a great job and explaining the process. It is fairly simple. The one rule that I’d like to pass on, that my mother instilled in me, is… “there are no rules for quilting”

Materials needed:

  • LOTS of shirts
  • Fabric scissors
  • Rotary cutter and mat
  • Ruler
  • Grey thread (whatever color you want)
  • Sheet (or fabric for the backing)
  • Batting
  • Yarn
  • Yarn needle
  • Binding
  • Quilting safety pins (to baste quilt sandwich together)

20150612_120825Once I had all the shirts cut and sized, I played with the layout of the shirts. And no, I did not use any stabilizer. I wanted my quilt really soft. There are people who have to use stabilizer and those who don’t care. I find there are pros and cons to both. For my next shirt quilt, I will try and use stabilizer. I think my quilt turned out perfect without it though.

Next I had to start sewing the shirts together. I sewed them by rows  first. Then I sewed the rows together. Then I made a border with my sheet. It was a Cal king sized sheet and so there was plenty of fabric. You can click HERE to see how I did it. It actually is a great way to make your quilt even. When sewing shirts/blocks together the quilt can become uneven.

20150621_185538Once they were sewed together I cut my batting (I used cheap polyester low loft batting from Walmart). I cut it a little bigger than the shirts, basically a few inches of the batting was sticking out from the edges. I also cut my old sheet (back of the quilt) the same size.

Then I made the quilt sandwich. This is where you put all your layers together and use your safety pins to make is stay and thus… start the quilting process!!! I actually sewed around the edges (where the silver border and shirts meet) of my quilt to make sure it wouldn’t come apart. Then with my yarn, I quilted it.

Then I cut the edges of the quilt sandwich to make it all uniform and even. Last I sewed on my nice white binding to put it all together. Throughout the entire quilt, I did use a 1/4 inch seam allowance. There are plenty of tutorials on Pinterest on how to do each individual part of the quilt, if you need assistance. The part I needed the most help on was adding the border to even out the quilt.

It isn’t perfect, but that’s what makes it a quilt!

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Double Layered Skirt

Recently, well perhaps a few weeks ago, I purchased 3 yards of Cinderella fabric form Etsy. I am absolutely in love with ANYTHING Cinderella. Seriously. It’s ridiculous. I just heard about the New Balance Cinderella running shoes coming out next year, and I already want to have them in my closet. I don’t even like New Balance, I use Brooks Ravenna running shoes – they’ve been the best for my feet. Anyways, I’m going to try to figure out a way to justify me getting them… Ideas? Send them my way! So I looked around on Pinterest for some inspiration on a new skirt style using elastic. I already have a tiered skirt that I made last year for the 4th of July. I wanted something a little special for my Cinderella fabric and something I could make easily without screwing up. I’ll also make a matching bow tie for my husband to wear with it. We like to match… Complete nerds? ABSOLUTELY! I made him a bow tie to match my American flag skirt. He was down with the idea of having a Cinderella bow tie. I have the BEST husband ever! So here is my quick tutorial on making a double layered skirt. It’s basically two skirts on top of each other with the skirt closest to the body being about 4-5 inches longer than the top layer.

Materials:

  • 1.5-2 yards of cotton blend fabric
  • Package (usually 3 yards in a package) of bias binding (opt.)
  • Waist band elastic (whatever thickness you’d like – I personally like thinner for this skirt)
  • Scissors
  • Measuring tape
  • Pins
  • Safety pin to thread the elastic through the waist band
  • Thread to match the bias tape and skirt. (I used purple and white)
  • Sewing machine

STEP ONE:

Cut your fabric to your measurements for the bottom and top skirt. You don’t need to cut your skirt layer in one piece – if you have smaller pieces of fabric, you can cut the skirt into two pieces and make two seams instead of one. I am pretty small, my waist is 25 inches, so I just used my fabric the way it was and just cut the length I needed.

Skirt width: measure around your waist and you can double that (makes a fuller skirt) or multiply that by 1.5 (not as full). It’s a matter of preference to what you want!

Bottom skirt length: (Longer skirt length) Measure from the waist down to where you’d like the skirt to end. If you will be using bias tape then you don’t need to add any more to the length because you won’t be making a seam. If you don’t want to use bias tape then I would add 1 & 1/2 inches to the bottom.

Top layer skirt length: (shorter skirt length) My top  layer skirt was cut about about 5 inches shorter. If you’re making a child skirt, I’d probably go 2-3 inches, but to make it proportionate and look good, I did 5 inches.

Once you figure out your measurements, you can start cutting your fabric!

STEP TWO:

Each layer will be sewn separately then joined together. I put the bias tape on the bottom of the skirts and sewed them on. If you don’t want to use bias tape, then you can make your hems now. I like doing the tape/hems now, before I sew the side seams because when I make my side seam on the skirt, I like the tape to look good and go in the seam, if that makes sense. If you aren’t sure how to sew bias tape to a fabric edge, click HERE.

STEP THREE:

You should have two skirt layers now. Stuff the longer layer inside the shorter layer and match them up at the top of the skirt. Make sure you have the fabric facing the way it should look when you’re wearing the skirt. Now, pin the two layers together and baste stitch at the top of the skirt.

STEP FOUR:

Once you baste stitch, you’re going to fold the top part of the skirt over, to the inside about 1/4 inch or smaller, and sew it in place. This will finish the top of the skirt and make it look good. Or you can use bias tape at the top to bring it together. I didn’t like the look of it, so I didn’t use bias tape.

STEP FIVE:

Cut your elastic to your waist size minus an inch (or however you’d like it to fit) and then use your elastic to gauge how wide the casing needs to be. Make sure you leave an opening for the elastic to come in and out! I used pins to help me remember to start and stop. Then you’ll sew around the skirt making the casing – sewing the two skirt layers together.

STEP SIX:

Now, insert the elastic between the two skirt layers and into the opening hole using the safety pin to weed it through. Then sew the ends together, make sure the elastic is flat and not twisted inside the casing. Unless it doesn’t annoy you. Then sew the casing hole shut.

And you are FINISHED!

Make A Baggy Shirt Into A Fitted Shirt Tutorial

I’ve been searching around online for a DIY fitted shirt tutorials and found a few that I liked. Most of them are on YouTube and some are on blogs. After searching I decided to combine what I learned along with my own ideas into my own tutorial on my blog. I started this venture because I bought an adult-size Barbie shirt off Ebay and I’m tired of all the adult shirts (shirts that are given out for races, concerts, etc) being bagging on me. Plus, I’m going as Barbie for Halloween and my husband will be GI Joe. We wanted something cheap and easy this year and we have all of his costume (compliments of his Naval Academy days), minus the beret. We actually bought a velvet black hat from Goodwill and turned the bill inside the hat and it works. So today I decided to try out a few ideas on making a loose shirt fitted; so when I make my Barbie shirt fitted, I would be a “pro” at it. What kind of Barbie wears loose clothes anyways? 😛

Materials needed:

  • Fitted shirt to use for a pattern
  • Pinking shears or fabric scissors
  • Pins
  • Matching thread
  • Sewing gauge
  • Sewing machine
  • Double needle for machine – optional (I like it for the bottom and sleeve hems – looks more professional)

The blue shirt will be the one used in the tutorial for making it fitted. The mint shirt is the fitted shirt that I’ll use as my pattern. The red shirt has already been fitted and will be what the blue shirt will end up looking like.

STEP ONE:

Fold your loose shirt over with the fitted shirt on top. Make sure everything is lined up perfectly! Check the collar and shoulders. If you would like, ironing would be a good idea.

STEP TWO:

Start cutting your shirt with your scissors and don’t forget the seam-allowance! When I get to the shoulders I cut off a few inches of the sleeve and then curve, the arm-pit area, to the body of the shirt.

STEP THREE:

Next you need to hem your sleeves and the bottom if you cut it to make it shorter. I used a sewing gauge to measure the distance from where the shoulder seam meets the sleeve to the edge on each side so both sides are balanced. Then I used an iron on the sleeves to keep them in place. Then I cut the bottom of the shirt so I can shorten it a little and add a hem it with the white thread to match my sleeves.

STEP FOUR:Pin the right sides together and sew! Make sure that the sleeves are lined up and the bottom too! Then turn it right side out and…

YOU’RE FINISHED!

Simplicity 1909 Dress

Today, I finished my dress for the Navy ball this weekend! It’s my first big project I have ever actually done. I read some reviews that said this dress is hard and not for the beginner. That may be true, but I finished it and I must say that it looks pretty good. I made a few changes to the pattern to make it more modest for my taste. The back went super low and I was not a fan of that, so I just brought it up. I also didn’t add any liner to the skirt of the dress and didn’t add the buttons to the back. I thought it would be too bulky and heavy for a ball gown. I did view C on the pattern (the top left of the packaging). I made a size 10 and brought it in a little to fit my waist and I used crepe back satin fabric.

Getting to work!

The most daunting task of anything related to sewing, at least to me, if you are using patterns is cutting and making sure everything lines up. It’s so tedious and I just want it to be over. I really just want to see the finished project. This one took me about a week with a couple days of not even touching it. So pretty much 4 days total. I also had to buy a new cutting mat because this one got too warped from our PCS (permanent change of station – military lingo for moving). We tried everything to fix it. Thank Heaven’s for Jo-Ann’s and their coupons! Also, be sure you actually read if the pattern goes side up or writing side down when you’re cutting out the fabric… It’ll help not waste fabric. Haha.

Here is the front part of the bodice.

The bodice is the first part you make according to directions. When I first bought fabric (5 yards), I wasn’t going to make a lining at all. I didn’t want the extra bulk and to be honest, the work. But after making the bodice, I decided I definitely needed to make a lining for it since it would help with the seams and make the dress look attractive. I actually didn’t even buy more fabric or any special lining fabric, I used the same fabric for it all and didn’t need extra. While making this dress, I learned what darts were and pleats. Near the shoulders, you were instructed to make pleats, but I just made darts and it turned out fine.

Working on the sleeves. Definitely need the liner.

The hardest part in making the dress was attaching to sleeves on correctly. I had to rip seam them a few times. Good thing I’ll probably just wear this dress this one time for the Navy Ball. I just got so excited and happy with my basting abilities and attaching the sleeve to the bodice, I wasn’t paying attention to which way I was sewing it. It’s hard to explain, but I made the back (where the zipper will go) the front. Then I did one sleeve correctly and the other was backwards. Ugh! After I got past this part, it wasn’t too bad. YouTube tutorials and blogs are amazing for helping with sewing definitions. It turned out well!

Working on the invisible zipper.

The invisible zipper was a little tricky, but wonder tape did WONDERS! Haha. Also, I have an amazing husband who would help me when I got frustrated and wanted to seam-rip the mess out of it all! I really want an invisible zipper foot. It’ll help the zipper be more invisible and so I don’t have to do some of it by hand. After I did the zipper, I put the dress on and decided how much I wanted to hem. I took about 3-4 inches off and then hemmed (I am about 61.5 inches tall). I did leave the train in the back because I thought it was adorable on me!

Ready for the Navy Ball 2013.

Back side of my dress.